Hey everybody! We are into full-on craziness here at Stony Creek!! We’re running around between the rain drops tilling and planting, moving fences and collecting eggs, harvesting our first crops and cooking delicious farm fresh meals AND...

discovering newborn animals!!

Here’s a quick look at the two new beltie calves that were born in the past 48hrs.

Also looking forward to full tents this weekend. Though we did have some great folks here last weekend, we’ll be sure to post some thoughts and pics after our first full weekend of accommodating guests in the Feather Down tents for the 2011 season.

until then..

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Posted
AuthorDaniel Marsiglio

We had three amazing families here for the weekend...One is still here, they planned to take monday off and are really enjoying their time here. They will be rewarded with a beautiful day tomorrow - 70 and sunny. Pizza night last night was amazing! A storm was predicted and as we were setting up a torrential downpour happened for about four minutes. Then the sky cleared and everyone had fun making their own pizza’s. Everyone shares of course. But who doesn’t want to self design their own pizza with farm fresh spinach, ricotta, garlic, or ham? Maia and John had fun just sending theirs in the oven ‘plain’ - literally some dough stretched out on the peel. Isaac fell asleep before dessert came out of the oven

Kate had a crazy few hours at the local farmer’s market in Franklin...tornado watch was in effect, but we advertise rain or shine. From 10-noon she held on to the tent canopy for dear life. The rain poured down and the wind threatened to whisk her and the other vendors to the next county. Now I know why I am a farmer and not a sailor. Thank you to the dedicated customers who braved the storm.

The weather promises to be beautiful tomorrow. Dan hopes to get the plastic on our house greenhouse, kate hopes to get tomatoes, corn and winter squash in the ground, and we hope to begin training our three apprentices in the workings of a semi-sustainable farmstead. Holly already has a good handle on many things and will be a great help in teaching Aaron and Kate the first few things.

Time for bed...I am already up too late!

Posted
AuthorDaniel Marsiglio
CategoriesFeather Down
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Okay so I woke up to milk and it was SNOWING!!What!

So after making sure all of the animals were cared for and checking in on our first Featherdown guests, I headed back to the home to feed myself and begin the rest of the day’s work: Washing eggs, churning butter, and making some soft cheese.

While doing some research on Eggs and pondering the fact that I have SO many of them...I came across the study from Mother Earth News about pastured eggs versus the standard $1.29 dozen. Here are the results in brief: They found that truly pastured hens lay eggs that have these numbers going for them in comparison to factory eggs, even factory organic eggs!

• 1/3 less cholesterol• 1/4 less saturated fat• 2/3 more vitamin A• 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids• 3 times more vitamin E• 7 times more beta carotene

UNBELIEVEABLE ! RIGHT? So I have to memorize these numbers so when people look at me crossed-eyed for charging a mere$4.75 a dozen (or even the $4 I charge in the winter) I can recite them. And then ask them how much they paid for their last soda, or muffin. You get the idea.

Posted
AuthorDaniel Marsiglio
CategoriesFeather Down

The KICK STOP - Well, it has been two milkings now, last evening and this morning that I have not been smeared with cow poop from Sierra’s over active leg!! How exciting. I thought that things were beyond hope yesterday morning. Disappointed that the families coming this summer wouldn’t be able to witness the magic of real milk from a real cow. Then Peter, dan’s dad, picked up the ‘kick stop’ - a small metal bar that hooks on her back leg and over her back - that I ordered two weeks ago. She literally cannot kick her leg. She can still shift around. But it seems like things will be okay. She is still a little sensitive to changes and people around, but I have a feeling that in time she will get used to those things too.

We are even beginning to have a little bit of a routine. She gave 2 1/4 gallons this morning! For the last week we have been able to put her out in the pasture next to the barn. It is a bit of dance getting her out to her area, but we are working on that too.

PEAS PLEASE - Dan helped me get the pea trellis up yesterday. It took about two hours, and dan wants to know how much money we will be making on peas this year. To be honest, I am not sure. Not sure how to track everything diligently AND get all of the farm work done. But does this mean I stop everything I am doing and only do the one thing that I am SURE we make a little bit of money on? Our pasture raised uber organic chickens, for example. I don’t feel like this is the answer simply because as sustainable organic farmers we know that raising a lot of one thing, denudes the land, inputs too much of a single type of manure (with animals) or encourages a single pest (like Potato bugs). There is an amazing system at work when you combine all of the little parts of our farm - I just can’t place a dollar value on that.

I have a lot of big questions about how we as a people expect small farms to do all of the amazing things that they do, but still pay the price we see at the grocery stores. Interested to hear what others think about this. I was talking to a dairy farmer about price increases not following the cost of living increase since the 70’s - if milk prices had been left to the market forces, like real estate for example, a gallon of milk (not organic) should really cost about $16!!

Posted
AuthorDaniel Marsiglio